Tuesday Trends: Sharon Stone loses right to dismiss Nanny case

Sharon Stone is set to face trial, initiated by her former nanny.
Erlinda Elemen claims that she was the target of “numerous derogatory comments and slurs” from the Basic Instinct actress. According to The Daily Telegraph, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ruled that Elemen can proceed with her allegations of harassment, failure to prevent harassment, retaliation and wrongful termination.
The allegations were officially filed last year and were dismissed as “absurd” and a way to “cash in” by Stone. Elemen, who was originally hired in 2006 as head nanny to Stone’s three children, claims that from August 2010 until she was fired in 2011, she was the subject of taunts related to her Filipino ethnicity and heritage.
The court papers state: “These statements included, without limitation, comments about Plaintiff’s Filipino accent (ie Plaintiff was instructed to refrain from speaking to the children because Defendant did not want them to ‘talk like you’) comments about Filipino food, and comments which equated being Filipino with being stupid.” The papers also say that Stone “was repeatedly verbally dismissive of Plaintiff’s deeply held religious beliefs”.
Stone tried to have the case thrown out of court, arguing that her various comments did not amount to harassment and that the case had been filed too late. Her lawyer Daniel Gutenplan said: “All we have is that Ms Stone made comments about Filipino food, Filipino accents.” 
However, news of Stone’s legal woes comes just days after the Total Recall actress’ former housekeeper Angelica Castillo also filed a lawsuit for wrongful termination last week. Castillo claims the actress verbally abused her, and made her perform chores even after a doctor had signed her off work due to a back injury.
Stone has denied the claims and her lawyers have dismissed them as “bizarre and ridiculous” and “malicious”.  They issued a statement saying: “We are confident that Ms Stone will prevail in this meritless case, and once that occurs, she intends to pursue affirmative claims for malicious prosecution against those responsible for filing and prosecuting this specious lawsuit.”
“We’re pleased that the judge recognised that the plaintiff’s claims should proceed,” said Ms Elemen’s lawyer, Solomon Gresen, following Friday’s ruling. Ms Elemen was hired in October 2006 and later became head nanny, helping to care for Ms Stone’s three adopted children – Roan, Laird and Quinn – two of whom she had adopted since her 2004 divorce from her second husband, journalist Phil Bronstein.
The nanny travelled the world with her celebrity employer but, from August 2010 until she was fired in early 2011, found herself the target of cruel taunts related to her Filipino ethnicity and heritage, according to her lawsuit.
“These statements included, without limitation, comments about Plaintiff’s Filipino accent (ie Plaintiff was instructed to refrain from speaking to the children because Defendant did not want them to ‘talk like you,’) comments about Filipino food, and comments which equated being Filipino with being stupid,” the court papers continue.
Ms Stone, who is a convert to Tibetan Buddhism and an ordained minister with the Universal Life Church – an independent religion that espouses freedom of worship – “was repeatedly verbally dismissive of Plaintiff’s deeply held religious beliefs,” the lawsuit adds, claiming that she criticised her live-in nanny for frequently attending church and, on one occasion, forbade her from reading the Bible in her room.
Ms Elemen claims that she was fired in February 2011 after Ms Stone accused her of “stealing” for having accepted overtime pay for periods when she had been required to travel with the children and work holidays.
The actress demanded that the nanny give the money back, it is alleged. Ms Stone had sought to have the case thrown out, arguing in court that her various comments did not amount to harassment and had been filed too late “All we have is that Ms Stone made comments about Filipino food, Filipino accents,” her lawyer, Daniel Gutenplan, complained.